Search:     WEDNESDAY, APRIL 23, 2014
Kim Jin Yoel
Producer: PURN Productions
2005
Color
99 minutes
South Korea
Korean
English subtitles
 
To BUY see pricing below.
 
Forgotten Warriors

A fascinating documentary about one of the little known legacies of the Korean War (1950-53), FORGOTTEN WARRIORS tells the stories of women guerilla fighters for North Korea who were captured, held for many years in South Korean jails - then released. Remaking their lives, assessing their past - and still socialist ot the core, this film profiles the characters and lives of these amazing women.

Reviews
"A fascinating documentary that focuses on a little-known set of events that affected thousands of women during the Korean civil war (1950-1953) and for decades beyond. The women, now in their seventies, met in prison in the 1950s, and come together in the film to reflect upon their experiences as Communist Party comrades who were captured, tortured, raped, and jailed in South Korean prisons by the right-wing anti-Communist party forces (the side of the war on whose behalf the United States government entered). The film shows us the day-to-day lives of the former prisoners in contemporary South Korea as they care for their families, bury their comrades, travel to rallies in support of re-unification/repatriation, and share memories of their experiences as partisans, soldiers, and prisoners. This documentary would be very useful in the classroom in a variety of Women's Studies, Asian Studies, Political Science, History, and Sociology courses."
- Laurie Schaffner, Films for the Feminist Classroom Journal

"Kim does a fine job of capturing the passion these women warriors hold for communism and Korean reunification. This documentary should be of interest to those with an interest in modern Korean history. It is recommended for viewers from high school through adult and the libraries who serve them."
- Paul Moeller, Educational Media Reviews Online (EMRO)

 

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