Film Image
Some Divine Wind
1991
Color
72 minutes
US
English

Some Divine Wind

SOME DIVINE WIND (a reference to the Japanese term Kamikaze, or “divine wind”) tells the story of Ben, whose father was part of a U.S. bombing mission that destroyed his Japanese mother’s village—and killed her entire family—during World War II. Although his father discovered this horrible coincidence upon meeting his wife after the war, he keeps the realization secret. When his father has a breakdown and confesses his tragic story, Ben is torn between his love for his parents, his feelings of betrayal, and his own fervent efforts to assimilate" --Museum of Modern Art
Reviews
"Struggling with the conflicts of assimilation in the shadow of the holocaust…History, is invoked." - Beth Coleman, THE VILLAGE VOICE
". . .Bogawa's peculiar temperament, one of the most totally Southern Californian sensibilities on film, is like a mixture of Chris Marker, Robert Towne, and James Benning. . ." - Daryl Chin, Image Forum
"In Some Divine Wind (1991), Roddy Bogawa explores the effect of war on generations once or twice removed from its horrors." - Cineprobe Series, The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Screenings
• If Film Could Smell Retrospective, Museum of Modern Art, 2013
Pricing & Ordering
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TWN acknowledges that in New York we are on the unceded territory of the Lenni Lenape, Canarsie, Shinecock, and Munsee peoples and challenges the harm that continues to be inflicted upon Indigenous and People of Color communities here and abroad, which is why we all need to be part of the struggle for rights, equality and justice.

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